Sansevieria trifasciata(Snake Plant)

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Sansevieria trifasciata(Snake Plant)

  • ₹200.00
  • Ex Tax:₹200.00
  • Brand: Plants and Pots
  • Product Code:Sansevieria trifasciata(Snake Plant)
  • Availability:In Stock

Description

It is an evergreen perennial plant forming dense stands, spreading by way of its creeping rhizome, which is sometimes above ground, sometimes underground. Its stiff leaves grow vertically from a basal rosette. Mature leaves are dark green with light gray-green cross-banding and usually range from 70–90 centimetres (28–35 in) long and 5–6 centimetres (2.0–2.4 in) wide, though it can reach heights above 2 m (6 ft) in optimal conditions.[citation needed]The specific epithet trifasciata means "three bundles".

The plant exchanges oxygen and carbon dioxide using the crassulacean acid metabolism process, which is only present in a small number of plant species. It allows them to withstand drought. The microscopic pores on the plant's leaves, called the stomata and used to exchange gases, are only opened at night to prevent water from escaping via evaporation in the hot sun. As a result, stored oxygen is released at the opening of the stomata at night, unlike most plants which continuously exchange gases during the day.[citation needed]It is a weed in some parts of northern Australia.

Cultivation and uses

Like some other members of its genus, S. trifasciata yields bowstring hemp, a strong plant fiber once used to make bowstrings.

It is now used predominantly as an ornamental plant, outdoors in warmer climates, and indoors as a houseplant in cooler climates. It is popular as a houseplant because it is tolerant of low light levels and irregular watering; during winter it needs only one watering every couple of months. It will rot easily if overwatered.

The NASA Clean Air Study found S. trifasciata has potential to filter indoor air, removing 4 of the 5 main toxins involved in the effects of sick building syndrome.[7] However, its rate of filtration is too slow for practical indoor use.

It can be propagated by cuttings or by dividing the rhizome. The first method has the disadvantage that the variegation will be lost.

S. trifasciata is considered by some authorities as a potential weed in Australia, although widely used as an ornamental, in both the tropics outdoors in both pots and garden beds and as an indoor plant in temperate areas.

The plant contains saponins which are mildly toxic to dogs and cats and can lead to gastrointestinal upset if consumed

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